Two dye fastness tests exposed to sunlight in India

Made:
1905-1915 in England
maker:
James Morton

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© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

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© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

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© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

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© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Science Museum Group
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Two dye fastness tests exposed to sunlight in India, by Alexander Morton and Company, 1905-1915. Part of the Morton Collection.

Scotish manufacturer James Morton was alarmed by how quickly his firm's synthetically dyed fabrics bleached in shop windows. He was a disciple of the arts and craft movement, which criticised industrial production of artificial dyes as dehumanising workers and commodifying traditional techniques. Morton became determined to produce a new range of unfadable dypes. These are two of multiple sample test cards of dyed yarn that Morton sent to his brother-in-Law in colonial India, with instructions to expose them to sunlight. Based on these results, he employed chamist James Christie to develop a new range of natural and synthetic dyes that were more permanent. These colours were then sold with a lifetime guarantee, the first of its kind in the textile industry.

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Science Museum: The Art of Innovation

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Details

Category:
Industrial Chemistry
Object Number:
1978-113/9
Measurements:
Fast colours: 90 mm x 418 mm x 3 mm,
type:
papers, dye pattern book, dye shade card, dyed fabric
credit:
Morton, J.W.F.

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