Barometer by Daniel Quare

Made:
1695-1705 in London
maker:
Daniel Quare
Portable mercury pillar barometer on claw foot stand Portable mercury pillar barometer on claw foot stand Portable mercury pillar barometer on claw foot stand

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Portable mercury pillar barometer on claw foot stand
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum, London

Portable mercury pillar barometer on claw foot stand
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum, London

Portable mercury pillar barometer on claw foot stand
Science Museum Group Collection
© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum, London

Portable mercury pillar barometer on claw foot stand, made and invented by Daniel Quare, Exchange Alley, London, England, 1695-1705.

This barometer was made by Daniel Quare, a leading London clockmaker. Quare obtained a patent for a barometer design in 1695. This claimed that the barometer could be inverted without either spilling the mercury or allowing air to get into the tube. William Derham, clergyman and natural philosopher, published an article in the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society describing using Quare’s barometer in experiments concerning air pressure at the Monument in 1697.

Details

Category:
Meteorology
Object Number:
1948-227
Materials:
brass (copper, zinc alloy), gilding, iron, glass, walnut (wood) and mercury
Measurements:
overall: 38.189 x 10.0394 x 10.0394 in.; 97 x 25.5 x 25.5 cm
type:
barometers
credit:
Meyrick, R.

Parts