Letter from Edward Pease, Darlington to Leonard Raisbeck, Stockton-upon-Tees

Made:
1828-01-25
part of archive:
Leonard Raisbeck Archive

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Regarding opposition to the railway company by the people of Stockton, mentioning Tennant's report and Langdale. Astonished at the opposition to the plans of the Stockton and Darlington Railway and that they favour 'Tennant's mad scheme' instead which would be 'tenfold more ruinous than our own'. Additional note discusses the possible introductions of a clause into the bill regarding foreign vessels and British vessels carrying foreign cargoes.

Details

Extent:
1 item
Identifier:
RAIS/4/1/11
Transcription:
Darlington 1 Mo 25:1828
Respected Friend
L Raisbeck
In reply to thy favor, altho’ the Gentl’n who informed me of thy opposition to to the proceed’gs of the RW Co was no longer within my reach, yet as the report gained ground I endeavored to track it to other channels & not doubt the propagator of the report is Tennant as he has declared to my last informant the Sampson Langdale told it publickly in the news room, that he Langdale had rec'd a letter from Mr Claridge request'g to know how the town of S felt with regard to the propos'd extension, & that Langdale shewed the letter to thee & took thy opinion as to what answer was to be returned, when it was recommended to Langdale by thee to say that the town was completely against the scheme & he was to recommend Mr. Claridge to Advise Lord Harewood to oppose the measure & Tennant added now what do you think of your Solicitor; if you disbelieve me ask Langdale if he did not state what I now tell you.

[Page 2]

It is it not needful to introduce a clause into your bill to place foreign vessels & British vessels hav'g cargoes of foreign produce at the same tonage dues as all other vessels _ these petty distinctions produce nothing of in amount equal to the discouragement they hold out to that [illegible] desire to cultivate _ on the enlarged principles of free trade it struck me a general act was passed a year or 2 ago which did away all these local distinctions, but as your custom house receves the tonage dues on foreigners in full I may be mistaken but it may be well to enquire of the Collector if such act as I allude to was passed.


[Page 3]


I thought it better to follow this to its source for it will be obvious to thee, there are not want’g individuals to break us up & any of our undertakings to get their own forward, and it quite astonishes me, & tempts me to change the source of my feeling of good wishes to the town of Stockton, to see how they feel toward us, to whom they owe so much, & how favorably they view Tennants mad scheme which if effected must be tenfold more ruinous then ours, I am sure Stockton cannot injure the Railway Co, but let them ask themselves if the Co cannot injure them, those who have no whip cord, should be careful how they lash those who have _
I still hope our streams may run smooth, I think if they go rough we have secured no small degree of strength & Mewburn hears nothing unfavorable with much
Regard in haste Thy assured Fr’d
Edward Pease

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