Letter from Joseph Pease, Darlington to Leonard Raisbeck, London

Made:
1828-03-24
part of archive:
Leonard Raisbeck Archive

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Refers to Raisbeck's resignation and Edward Pease's reaction to it. 'I may repeat that my father was not prepared to hear of thy resignation, a letter from him this morning says 'since the meeting invite to him (L.R.) I could not conceive how a solicitor could resign a client and in possession of his clients confidence and views go over to an interest that was adverse'.

Details

Extent:
1 item
Identifier:
RAIS/4/1/19
Transcription:
Darlington 3/24 : 1828

Esteemed Friend
Leonard Raisbeck

I am duly in receipt of thine and cannot but regret the determined [illegible] – still I must be allowed to question the right of any party to disturb confidential relations or that policy which dictates open conflict where there is an option of honourable neutrality.
I may repeat that my father was not prepared to hear of thy resignation, a letter from him this morning says “since the meeting I wrote to him (LR) that I could not conceive how a Solicitor could resign a Client, and in possession of his Clients confidence and views go over to an interest which was adverse, at least that I c’d not think any one would ever review such a line of conduct as satisfactory.” So far as the navigation business goes we should probably agree upon what might be reasonably expected at thy hands, but is it not clear that a party at Stockton has neither right nor claim to expect any one of the R’way. Co. advisors

[Page 2]

to desert his colours, however individuals of that company may act in reference to another project.
The Railway Co. as a body have never lent either their influence, money nor name to oppose the favourite measure at Stockton, but a many highly respectable Gentleman wholly unimplicated in the present contention are their made the victims of a conflict over which they do not process even the shadow of control.
Is it not fair to enquire whether even those Gentleman who are alike interested in both schemes have ever availed themselves of their position as proprietors in the Tees Navigation to annoy you and Stockton. ¬¬ And however I may esteem and value my Friend Richardson, and his judgement, the position is incontrovertible that no individual can ever release a public pledge, and I am sure he would agree with me that the Town of Stockton’s application ought not to have been entertained and thus mutual harmony might have remained unimpaired – however to come to the point, if no reasoning can have any effect upon thee as the R’way. Company’s Solicitor, as a Lawyer, as a Railway Proprietor or as a Gentleman jealous of his honour, I must beg a few lines saying whether the tendered resignation is wholly without reference to the power of a General Meeting to accept or reject it. As is has been now regularly communicated to the Committee by our chairman I presume it will become our duty to take the sense of a General Collecting upon it, if such an Assembly is recognized in thy view as have any claim on the [illegible] of long continued connection and mutual confidence to withhold its approbation, I mean its acquiescence. I remain true to my own opinions that the views entertained by some of the Inhabitants of Stockton of the new branch Railway are at variance with sound policy, experience or the public good & whilst I recognise their rights to treat the Company as they think best in an open manner I deny that in their transactions in this particular they have dealt either fairly or honourably by us.
I anticipate the triumph of a Common Energy over us all, and the Fable of a divided faggot will again prove its moral.

From Thine Sincerely
Jo’s Pease S’n.

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