Letter from J [Malden?] Sherwood to Leo Raisbeck, Stockton-on-Tees, marked 'private'

Made:
1830
part of archive:
Leonard Raisbeck Archive

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© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

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© The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Proposes a reconciliation of opinions.

Details

Extent:
1 item
Identifier:
RAIS/4/7/5
Transcription:
Private
My dear Sir
I am of course most anxious to retain the kind opinion of all my friends [illegible] in the Railway; for whom - ( [illegible] friend Pease particularly) – I have the highest possible regard & esteem.
As I take for granted that they must be acquainted with the M’r Mewburn’s unfortunate propensity to foist blame from himself onto others, so I take for granted that they would not consider as conclusive his [illegible] more blame [illegible] upon the present occasion.
Shall, however be obliged [illegible] to Pease & others, whenever an opportunity occurs, that I have no doubt of Mr. Mewburn veracity in stating that I altered the
Page 2

description of the line. That it is [illegible] custom, as it is my bounding duty to make such alterations in draft bills, which are to be again submitted to the local solicitor, as in my judgement are necessary. But that I expect, as a freemason, that the local solicitor who possesses local knowledge will [illegible] my alterations; & take care that such alterations are consistent with facts & with the local interests of my clients. And that I know of no other reason [illegible] to him the Draft than that his local knowledge sh’d supply what my local ignorance may have omitted.
As regards the present imbalance, do you not think that upon suggestion from you, some member would ask Mewburn whether the Draft of the Bill was returned to him after I had settled it before & he admits that it was, is not the conclusion natural, that he was

[illegible] not perusing my alterations. I am of course unwilling to give Mewburn pain or offence: but if you find that my object cannot be affected without a positive change from you (or any [illegible]) that the Draft so altered was returned to him, [illegible] do me the kindness to produce this letter, or any preceding letter to the Meeting.

I am tr’y Dear Sir
Most fait’y Sir
T Moulden Sherwood
Parliament
16 Jan’y 1830

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